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FEATURED PROJECTS

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COMPREHENSIVE LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP PROGRAM

Under a HRSA cooperative agreement, CPHI is building the Comprehensive Long-Term Follow-Up (COLT) program. The goal of the COLT program is to create the framework and infrastructure for a state-level long-term follow-up (LTFU) program in Colorado and Wyoming for newborn screening. The system created will provide a tool for LTFU surveillance and bi-directional communication between public health and clinical care to ensure affected infants are receiving appropriate LTFU care in medical homes, changes in diagnoses are communicated, milestones are met, missed cases are identified, and parents are able to be active decision-makers in their child’s care.

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COLORADO SICKLE CELL DATA COLLECTION

The Colorado Sickle Cell Data Collection (SCDC) Program, led by the Center for Public Health Innovation, uses data to study long-term trends in diagnosis, treatment, and healthcare access to improve the lives of people with sickle cell disease. With funding from the Centers for Disease Control, the Colorado SCDC project combines data from newborn screening, electronic medical records, and all-payer claims data to better understand the prevalence of sickle cell disease and to identify long-term trends in diagnosis, treatment, and healthcare access for people with sickle cell disease in Colorado. Visit the Colorado SCDC website to learn more about the project. 

Newborn

CYSTIC FIBROSIS NEWBORN SCREENING SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENT

Cystic fibrosis newborn screening has been universally offered in the United States since 2009. Nevertheless, there is significant variability in the time to diagnosis and clinical outcomes for affected infants. CPHI has collaborated with experts to identify barriers to timely newborn screening and propose solutions. Comprehensive state reports have been developed by CPHI to present state-level data from newborn screening through the first years of life. These reports have helped uncover disparities in CF newborn screening, particularly affecting black and Hispanic infants, leading to poor outcomes. CPHI is leading of a series of learning collaboratives, bringing together state public health professionals and CF center clinicians to devise solutions for their state-based newborn screening programs. This work has been made possible through funding from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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SECURING EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC KEYS TO STABILITY

Nationally, data on employment rates from 2017 illustrate a large discrepancy, between the employment rates of people with disabilities (77%) compared to those without disabilities with (37%). CPHI is working with the Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation’s Office of Independent Living to conduct a random assignment study, known as Securing Employment and Economic Keys to Stability (SEEKS), which aims to increase employment for adult persons (ages 18-60 years of age) with disabilities who receive services from a Center for Independent Living (CIL), increase gross income, and/or reduce social isolation. Colorado is the only state which received funding from National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) to test this new approach.

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